Roles in My Dear Prince [Updated 15 Nov 2010]

The dynamic between Kaede and Sara is a unique one.  Whereas the other couples are clearly defined in terms of dominant/submissive, the placement of roles is not so concrete in their case.  The order of dominance between each couple can be diagrammed this way:

Nanami ← Yuuna
Kaede ↔ Sara
Mai → Reo
Takako ← Runa
Shizuku ← Erisu

Most of the pairs are stable in terms of dominance, with one character always looking up to another (sometimes literally).  For example, Nanami is always the one looking up to Yuuna; the dynamic never reverses due to their different, unchanging societal positions within the school.  In the omake track of Zutto Issho no Natsu (ずっといっしょの夏), “Mai & Reo’s Sonohana Omake Corner”, Reo angrily questions why she is always the uke to Mai’s seme, and asks if she can be the seme for once. Mai plainly and sternly answers that that will never happen, simply because it’s destiny.  By contrast, Kaede and Sara change places often within their story.  They could even be considered as equal to one another at many points, which none of the other couples save for perhaps Erisu and Shizuku can be said to have for any considerable length of time.  Continue reading Roles in My Dear Prince [Updated 15 Nov 2010]

Miscellaneous Trends

This is a list of odd patterns I’ve noticed within the series.

General

  • Each couple introduced alternates between conventional and unconventional dynamics. The first couple, Nanami and Yuuna, represent one of the most traditional yuri pairing types, having some obvious parallels to Maria-sama ga Miteru. The next couple, Kaede and Sara, are of a less common archetype: long-lost relatives. Mai and Reo bring back the familiarity with a hot/cold relationship. The most unconventional couple, Takako and Runa, are also the most controversial, being at least ten years apart. They have been followed by the second most popular couple, the domestic/foreign pairing between Shizuku and Erisu.

Visual Novels

  • The fourth game onward starts using hearts in the text.  Occasionally, lines containing it will be cleared before the entire line is spoken if auto-skip is enabled. I believe this is a glitch that has yet to be addressed.
  • The first two sets of three games, informally referred to as the first and second seasons, are 15 chapters long. The next three games are 18 chapters long. Hanahira! is 50 chapters long, although the chapters are very short and consist entirely of dialogue.

Light Novels

  • The covers of the first three light novels depict each character nude. This trend reverses with each set of novels, with the exception of 番外総集編.

Drama CDs

  • The first three covers include water.
  • The first three CDs take place in the summer.
  • The amount of exposition decreases with each CD. The first CD is formatted similar to the visual novels, with dialogue and internal monologue taking turns advancing the story, with the exception of the omake track. The second CD is formed with blocks of dialogue broken up with periodic exposition following the first track. The third CD has no narration whatsoever, similar to the Reo/Mai Diaries and Hanahira!

Why does no one write about 唇とキスで呟いて?

[Update 11/01/2011] An overview of this game was written at Listless Ink. Note that it contains spoilers.

Much has been discussed of the first game in the series since it was translated. Some reviewers have even gone out of their way to provide insights on the following four games, all as of yet untranslated. However, the sixth is rarely discussed outside of a CG link. I admit I don’t have much experience with it myself, but I couldn’t help but notice that no one else ever brings up its place in the series other than it’s a direct sequel to the first.
Continue reading Why does no one write about 唇とキスで呟いて?

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